1. What is the Nevada Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act?

SB 459 provides immunity to individuals who, acting in good faith and with reasonable care, administer an opioid antagonist to someone experiencing an opioid-related drug overdose. Good Samaritan immunity is provided to individuals who seek medical help for others, themselves, or are the subject of the help request.

  1. When does the Nevada Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act apply?

The Act applies when individuals who report an overdose or other medical emergency to law enforcement, 911, or a provider of emergency medical services; assist another individual making a report; provide care to someone experiencing an overdose or medical emergency while waiting for medical assistance; or deliver an individual experiencing an overdose or medical emergency to a medical facility.

  1. What is covered under the Nevada Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act?

The Act provides immunity for those who have acted in good faith from the use of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, violation of a restraining order, violation of a condition of your parole or probation, or possession of narcotics with the exception GHB or Rohypnol without a prescription, possession with the intent to sell, more than 12 marijuana plants, or more than 200 grams of a Schedule II controlled substance.

  1. Will a prescriber be held liable for prescribing Naloxone?

Nevada’s Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act provides immunity to health care professionals who prescribe and dispense either directly or by standing order Naloxone or another opioid antagonist during treatment for a legitimate medical condition:

  • An individual identified as at risk of experiencing an opioid-related drug overdose; or
  • A family member, friend or other person in a position to assist a person at risk of experiencing an opioid-related drug overdose.
  1. What other health care professionals are protected under the Act?

The Act provides immunity for law enforcement officers, EMTs and paramedics who administer an opioid antagonist to someone that they reasonably believe to be experiencing an opioid-related drug overdose.

  1. Are there other requirements for professionals under the Act?

SB 459 also requires first-time prescribing physicians or when a new course of treatment begins to obtain a patient utilization report from the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PMP) before they initiate a prescription for a controlled schedule II, III, or IV prescription drug.